Poetry Friday: Remembering 9/11 and Oregon Fires

Thanks to Kiesha at Whispers From the Ridge for hosting our poetry community.

This has been a week. It’s difficult to believe that on Monday, we traveled to Central Oregon for grandgirl’s drop off. Understanding the wind and traffic we chose a different route. Little did we know that were on a road that within 12 hours would be engulfed in flames. Little did we know that the place we ate dinner would be flattened by fire overnight. The smoke has moved in and settled around us, it’s an unwelcome guest.
Here are two thoughts about the week.

And today marks 19 years, since once again innocence was destroyed,

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On September 25, I will be hosting Poetry Friday.

NATIONAL MATH STORYTELLING DAY #MathStorytellingDay is September 25

A little history. It was created in 2009. It’s a day to tell stories using math.

The fourth Friday of September is #NationalBRAVEDay. September 25th is that Friday.
This began in 2017 to uplift and honor the women who make up feel brave.

So why am I focusing on September 25, 2020? Because I will be hosting Poetry Friday.

How about the theme of poems that tell a math story or honor a brave woman might be fun.

Maybe your poem will feature a poem steeped in a mathematical structure: Fibonacci, Zeno, Cinquain, Nonet, Sijo, or Arun. Or any poem with a mathematical structure.

Maybe your poem will combine both BRAVE and a Math Story. 

Need help with some mathematical poetry types?

Poem Types

Poem TypePattern

Arun
An Arun is a fifteen-line poem in three sets of five lines.  Each set of five lines follows the same syllable structure: starting with one syllable and increasing by one (1/2/3/4/5 — 3x). By  if you want kin, you must plant kin 
FibonacciSix-line, 20-syllable poem, 1-1-2-3-5-8 by Greg Pincus
SepterceptEach verse (as many verses as you want) needs to have three lines, each with seven syllables. It can be rhymed or not. Inventor by Jane Yolen
ShadormaThe Shadorma is a Spanish style form of poetry with a 3-5-3-3-7-5 syllable pattern
ZenoA pattern featuring syllables of 8-4-2-1-4-2-1-4-2-1 with an “abcdefdghd” rhyme scheme. Created by J.Patrick Lewis
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13 Responses to Poetry Friday: Remembering 9/11 and Oregon Fires

  1. cvarsalona says:

    Jone, your challenge is a very interesting one. I have been mulling it over for several days.

  2. Jone, Sending positive thoughts your way, and I’m hoping the air starts to improve. For my Figure Class this week my model was working for me remotely from Portland, Oregon, and I was very concerned for her too. Thanks for your telling poem, and your ideas for your forthcoming post.

  3. Kay Mcgriff says:

    My thoughts have been with you and all who are living through these fires. It is hard to wrap my mind around the devastation, just as it was hard to wrap my mind around the devastation of 9/11. May you stay safe.

  4. lindabaie says:

    You know I’m thinking of you & thank you for posting on FB, Jone. I am sorry for the fires, hope I can help in the ‘after’! “smoke eats fire” is true, sad to agree. I like all your ideas for Sept. 25th, have noted them! Best of wishes to you & yours!

  5. maryleehahn says:

    Oh my goodness! The connection between your story (what happened so suddenly, so destructively, so cataclysmically just after you were there) and the events of 9/11…eerie.

  6. margaretsmn says:

    I can’t even imagine the horror. At least with a hurricane, we can watch a map and have some idea of what’s coming. Fire engulfs and spits out ash. Prayers for your part of the world. Stay safe!

  7. Linda Mitchell says:

    Oh, the photos of Oregon are quite disturbing. I pray you keep safe. I love your sketch journals. There’s so much movement in what you draw…even the sad pages.

  8. Sue says:

    I am in Washington State, we are surrounded by wildfires too, the closest is nine miles away. For now we are safe, but my heart is heavy for all those impacted by this wildfire season. Your poem was spot on! Stay safe 🙂

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